Current GMO Crops

 

The nine genetically modified crops available today: sweet and field corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes, and squash.  GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available in Fall 2017.

Below is a list outlining the year in which the nine crops that are currently commercially available were launched:

  • Squash, 1995
  • Cotton, 1996
  • Soybean, 1995
  • Corn, 1996
  • Papaya, 1997
  • Alfalfa, 2006
  • Sugar beets, 2006
  • Canola, 1999
  • Potato, 2016
  • Apples, to be released in Fall 2017

The list below identifies the genetic traits expressed and uses of the 10 GMO crops approved in the U.S.

 

Genetic traits expressed in GMOs in the U.S.

 

These 10 crops are the only GMOs that are approved in the U.S.  Many of these crops are used as processed ingredients, like sugar or cornstarch, in food products you may find in your local grocery store.  Only some varieties of papaya, potatoes, squash and sweet corn may be available in your store’s produce aisle. 

You can find out more about GMOs in the Grocery Store here.

 

Infographics & Downloadables

SOCIAL TILE: Get to Know GMOs

SOCIAL TILE: The GMO Innovation Contest

SOCIAL TILE: MYTH vs. FACT: GMOs & Allergies

SOCIAL TILE: MYTH vs. FACT: GMOs’ Impact On Pollinators

INFOGRAPHIC: The History of Genetic Modification in Crops

INFOGRAPHIC: Are GMOs Safe?

HANDOUT: GMO Answers Informational Guide

More Information for Current GMO Crops

If Himalayan pink salt doesn't have genes, how can it be a GMO? It can't.

GMO Myths vs. Facts

There are many myths and misconceptions about GMOs. Let’s take a look at a few of the most common myths and learn about the facts: MYTH:There are dozens of GMO crops, including strawberries, bananas and wheat.There is even GMO water and GMO salt. FACT:There are nine genetically modified crops commercially available today: sweet and field corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes, and squash. GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available soon. This chartexplains why each of the nine GMO crops are genetically modified. The majority of these crops, like alfalfa, field corn and soy are actually used...
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GMOs and Livestock

In the United States, livestock have been consuming feed made from genetically modified crops for almost twenty years.More than two-thirds of GM corn and half of GM soybeans are used for livestock feed. In that time,GMOs have never been detected in the milk, meat or eggs derived from animals fed genetically modified feed. Meaning livestock process GMO feed in the same way as any other feed. Many studies have been conducted on the potential for GMO DNA or proteins to be transferred into animal tissues.No intact or immunologically reactive protein or DNA has been detected in animal tissue. Alison Van Eenennaam, Animal Genomics and Biotechnology Cooperative...
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GMOs in the Grocery Store

GMO Crops Contrary to misconceptions, only a few GMO crops in the grocery store are available as whole produce – sweet corn, summer squash, papayas and potatoes. But large sections of the produce aisle are not comprised of GMOs. Seedless watermelons, for instance, are not GMOs. Other food products, however, may contain ingredients derived from GMO crops. Ingredients derived from genetically modified corn, soy, sugar beets and canola are used in a wide variety of foods including cereal, corn chips, veggie burgers and more. However, it is important to remember that genetically modified crops are nutritionally equivalent to non-genetically modified foods,...
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Where GMOs Are Grown

Think only U.S. farmers grow GMO crops? You might be surprised to know that while each country has its own regulatory process for both the cultivation and sale of GM products, as of 2016, GMOs are grown, imported and/or used in more than 75 countries across the globe. As of 2015, 2.0 billion cumulative hectares of biotech crops have been planted since 1996. This includes a wide [no-lexicon]variety[/no-lexicon] of crops and countries, including maize in Spain, Bt cotton in Sudan, eggplant in Bangladesh, soybeans in Bolivia and more. The top five countries planting biotech crops by hectarage are the U.S., Brazil, Argentina, India and Canada. A single GM...
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Current GMO Crops

The nine genetically modified crops available today: sweet and field corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes, and squash. GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available in Fall 2017. Below is a list outlining the year in which the nine crops that are currently commercially available were launched: Squash, 1995 Cotton, 1996 Soybean, 1995 Corn, 1996 Papaya, 1997 Alfalfa, 2006 Sugar beets, 2006 Canola, 1999 Potato, 2016 Apples, to be released in Fall 2017 The list below identifies the genetic traits expressed and uses of the 10 GMO crops approved in the U.S. These 10 crops are the only GMOs that are approved in the U...
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How GMOs Are Made

Farmers have selectively cultivated plants for thousands of years, choosing a plant, for example, based on its ability to survive certain conditions or on how many seeds it produces.Farmers also sought to improve plants by crossing them with related species that had other desirable characteristics. This type of selective, or traditional, breeding involves crossing thousands of genes. Genetically modified organisms are the product of a targeted process where a few select genes are transferred into a plant to produce a desired trait. When scientists create a genetically modified plant, the process begins by identifying a desired trait.That trait may be...
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GMO Basics

What are GMOs? Are GMOs safe? Why do farmers grow GMO crops? We know there are a lot of questions regarding GMOs, Genetically Modified Organisms. Let’s start with the basics. What Are GMOs? When people refer to genetically modified organisms - GMOs - they are referring to crops developed through genetic engineering, a more precise method of plant breeding. Genetic engineering, also referred to as biotechnology, allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait found in nature and transfer it from one plant or organism to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. Some examples of...
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Articles

ARTICLE: Like it or not, Africa’s future lies in GM crops Read More
ARTICLE: GMOs present controversy; Are they safe? Read More